Google forms PowerMeter partnership

first_imgGoogle PowerMeter TED 5000 (PhysOrg.com) — Google has announced it has secured its first official device partner for Google PowerMeter, which means you can now use the software without having a smart meter installed by your utility company. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Energy Inc.’s President and CEO, Dolph Rodenberg said he expects the partnership with Google to raise public awareness of energy use. An association with Google might also help with Energy Inc.’s efforts to raise funds.The standard TED 5000 retails for about $200, and can be installed by anyone familiar enough with electrical components and the circuit breaker panel to be confident working with the electric panel removed. Installation is a breeze for an electrician.Energy Inc. is the first company to become a device partner with Google PowerMeter, and Google is actively seeking more energy monitor manufacturers for possible future partnerships.More information:• Google PowerMeter software• Google blog post• TED 5000© 2009 PhysOrg.com Google PowerMeter was launched earlier this year, and is a free software package for monitoring electricity usage. Until now it has only worked for homes with smart meters installed, which is only 6% of the market in North America. Smart meters are installed by utilities and provide information about electricity use more regularly than the more usual monthly. They are designed mainly to help the utilities cope with peaks and troughs in the demand for electricity.Knowing first-hand how much energy your home is using is a powerful way to adjust your energy use. So Google decided to make electricity use data accessible to everyone, with Google PowerMeter.After a year of talks, Google has now finalized a device partnership with Energy Inc. and its product The Energy Detective (TED). This means that anyone in North America who purchases and installs a TED 5000 will be able to use Google PowerMeter via the web or via smart phones with iGoogle if they wish to monitor their energy use. If you already have a TED 5000 a free upgrade is available for download.One advantage of the partnership is that the software can become available for more people more quickly. Another advantage is that the TED 5000 provides more data than the smart meters, and the information is available online from Google PowerMeter at 10-minute intervals. This is significantly better than smart meter data, and the device is geared more to the consumer than to the electricity provider.Near-immediate access to energy use information is important because the energy user is likely to be more engaged with the data, and that engagement tends to lead to changes in behavior that result in reducing the electricity use. The PowerMeter and TED 5000 combination will allow users to view almost instant data, as well as weekly trends and comparisons with other PowerMeter users. Explore further Google’s PowerMeter Will Help Reduce Energy Consumption (Video) Citation: Google forms PowerMeter partnership (2009, October 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-google-powermeter-partnership.htmllast_img read more

Read More

New research proves parrot chicks learn their names from parents

first_img Citation: New research proves parrot chicks learn their names from parents (2011, July 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-parrot-chicks-parents.html While this research is interesting for its own sake, it’s also interesting because very few animals are known to use identifiers to distinguish members from one another. Up till it was found in parrots, only humans and dolphins have been known to do so. Giving group members names, in addition to demonstrating some degree of intelligence, also helps groups maintain social order. With the parrots, it’s needed because the flocks change members frequently, so everyone having names makes it easier for everyone to keep up with who’s who. Also, green-rumped parrotlets need some means for identification because they continue to rely on Mom and Dad to feed them for up to three weeks after they’ve left the nest. Getting lost in a crowd would not be a good thing at that point.Parrot communication in the wild from Karl Berg on Vimeo.To prove it was the parents creating the names, the researchers went down to a Venezuelan research site where green-rumped parrots have been studied in the wild for 24 years. There they installed video cameras and microphones in nests and swapped the eggs of half of the study group, and then recorded the results as they unfolded. The reason egg swapping was needed was because it has already been shown that parrots and their offspring sound more alike in their calls than they do others in their flock. Thus, if the calls and unique identifiers given to the young were more like their foster parents, than their biological parents, it would show that the calls were learned, rather than innate; which is of course how it turned out. The researchers also studied the audio/video carefully and discovered that the parents actually named each individual offspring before the little guys themselves could utter a peep, proving once and for all that it was in fact, the parents doing the naming.It has been suggested that such research might have implications for gaining new insights into how humans learn to talk and why we name our own offspring, and what its impact has on our own species as a whole. Explore further ‘Mum! I’m hungry!’ Hungry chicks have unique calls to their parents This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: “Vertical transmission of learned signatures in a wild parrot” doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0932AbstractLearned birdsong is a widely used animal model for understanding the acquisition of human speech. Male songbirds often learn songs from adult males during sensitive periods early in life, and sing to attract mates and defend territories. In presumably all of the 350+ parrot species, individuals of both sexes commonly learn vocal signals throughout life to satisfy a wide variety of social functions. Despite intriguing parallels with humans, there have been no experimental studies demonstrating learned vocal production in wild parrots. We studied contact call learning in video-rigged nests of a well-known marked population of green-rumped parrotlets (Forpus passerinus) in Venezuela. Both sexes of naive nestlings developed individually unique contact calls in the nest, and we demonstrate experimentally that signature attributes are learned from both primary care-givers. This represents the first experimental evidence for the mechanisms underlying the transmission of a socially acquired trait in a wild parrot population. In a bit of interesting research whose missions was to find out if green-rumped parrots learn the calls that are used by themselves and others to identify them in their flock, or if such calls are innate, and others learn the name from the chicks, researchers from Cornel University swapped eggs between nests in a wild group of the birds, then set about filming and recording the action as it unfolded. The results of their efforts have been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, and it turns out it’s the parents of the chicks, generally called parrotlets, that give their young their identifiers, rather than simply listening to what originates from the little chicks beaks when they begin chirping.last_img read more

Read More

Samsung will open up on bigLITTLE processor at ISSCC

first_img Citation: Samsung will open up on big.LITTLE processor at ISSCC (2012, November 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-samsung-biglittle-processor-isscc.html (Phys.org)—Samsung will turn heads at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in February when it describes the first mobile applications processor to use ARM’s big.LITTLE concept. This is an important opportunity and timing for Samsung, as the ISSCC is a major event for the semiconductor industry. The approach is expected to become widely used in smartphones. Samsung’s processor is to use ARM’s big.LITTLE architecture. This translates into a SoC built with a 28 nanometer manufacturing process, with one cluster tuned for sheer performance while the other cluster is optimized for battery life. These are two quad-core clusters, one for high performance applications such as video gaming and the other for energy efficiency. © 2012 Phys.org ARM deals efficiency ace with big.LITTLE and Cortex-A7 More information: www.miracd.com/ISSCC2013/PDF/I … 13AdvanceProgram.pdfvia EE Timescenter_img One cluster runs at 1.8 GHz (Cortex A15) and is geared for high-performance applications; the other runs at 1.2 GHz (Cortex A7) and is tuned for energy efficiency. The pairing of “half powerful” and “half frugal” cores will be suitable for longlasting phones and tablets. An analyst with the Linley Group said that the A7 cores should be capable of handling most smartphone tasks. According to a white paper from ARM that outlines the big.LITTLE system, the Cortex A15 processor is paired with a “LITTLE” Cortex A7 processor to create a system that can accomplish both high-intensity and low-intensity tasks in the most energy-efficient manner. “By coherently connecting the Cortex-A15 and Cortex-A7 processors via the CCI-400 coherent interconnect, the system is flexible enough to support a variety of big.LITTLE use models, which can be tailored to the processing requirements of the tasks,” according to the paper.The process enables the same application software to switch between them. “By selecting the optimum processor for each task, big.LITTLE can extend battery life by up to 70 percent,” claimed ARM. Through these techniques, added ARM, big.LITTLE will provide the opportunity to raise performance and extend battery life in mobile platforms. What will Intel and NVIDIA reveal about processor plans at the meeting? Intel will not be presenting processor papers at the event, according to a report. Instead, Intel is to describe a scalable 64-lane chip-to-chip interconnect with 1 Tbit/s aggregate bandwidth. NVIDIA is to describe a 20 Gbit/s serial die-to-die link made in 28-nm CMOS. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More

Study of grinding stones suggests adaption to ice age may have led

first_img The team studied three grinding stones found in the Yellow River region and have dated back their use to a time somewhere between 23,000 and 19,500 years ago. This coincides with the peak of the last major ice-age (glacial maximum) and suggests early hunter-gatherers had begun to rely more on gathering (and processing to some extent) as hunting became a less reliable food source. But because prior research by other groups has found that agriculture didn’t get going in China until approximately 11,000 years ago, that means that it took approximately 12,000 years to move from eating local foods, to growing them on purpose in specified ways.In studying the grinding stones, the researchers found residue from the plants that were ground with them—they included grains such as millet as well as beans, yams and other roots. Other research has also found evidence to indicate that there was a short period of warmth in the region approximately 23,000 years ago, which would have provided an opportunity for people to begin exploiting such plants in earnest. That in turn appears to have led to developing methods to make such food more palatable by grinding them and perhaps mixing them together with other ingredients. This switchover, due to adjusting to the ice-age, the team theorizes, could mark the turning point that eventually led to the development of agricultural practices as a means of giving people more control over the way their food was obtained. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Europe’s first farmers replaced their Stone Age hunter-gatherer forerunners (Phys.org) —A researcher from Stanford’s Archaeology Center, working with colleagues in China has found evidence to support the notion that early hunter-gatherers in China turned to processing plant foods in order to survive the last ice-age and in so doing may have started down the path that would eventually lead to farming. The team, led by Li Liu studied grinding stones dated back to between 23,000 and 19,500 years ago, and have found that their use suggests that those that used them were doing so to supplement dwindling food supplies found via hunting. The group has published a paper detailing their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.center_img More information: Paleolithic human exploitation of plant foods during the last glacial maximum in North China, PNAS, Published online before print March 18, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1217864110 AbstractThree grinding stones from Shizitan Locality 14 (ca. 23,000–19,500 calendar years before present) in the middle Yellow River region were subjected to usewear and residue analyses to investigate human adaptation during the last glacial maximum (LGM) period, when resources were generally scarce and plant foods may have become increasingly important in the human diet. The results show that these tools were used to process various plants, including Triticeae and Paniceae grasses, Vigna beans, Dioscorea opposita yam, and Trichosanthes kirilowii snakegourd roots. Tubers were important food resources for Paleolithic hunter–gatherers, and Paniceae grasses were exploited about 12,000 y before their domestication. The long tradition of intensive exploitation of certain types of flora helped Paleolithic people understand the properties of these plants, including their medicinal uses, and eventually led to the plants’ domestication. This study sheds light on the deep history of the broad spectrum subsistence strategy characteristic of late Pleistocene north China before the origins of agriculture in this region. Citation: Study of grinding stones suggests adaption to ice age may have led to birth of agriculture in China (2013, March 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-stones-ice-age-birth-agriculture.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Burial chamber of Sennedjem, Scene: Plowing farmer. Credit: Wikipedia.last_img read more

Read More

Researchers find brain activity response different for virtual reality versus the real

first_imgThe hippocampus is located in the medial temporal lobe of the brain. Image via Wikipedia. © 2013 Phys.org Explore further Researchers in many parts of the world are studying how virtual reality works in the brain. Some do so to better learn how the brain works, others are more interested in creating games or virtual reality environments to allow people to experience things they couldn’t otherwise. In either case, despite the increase in processing power and graphics capabilities, virtual reality systems just don’t live up to the real world. People can always tell the difference. To find out why, the researchers in this new effort turned to rats—most specifically, their hippocampus’s—the part of the brain that has been identified as building and controlling cognitive maps.The hippocampus has what are known as neural “place” cells. Researchers believe they are building blocks that are used to assemble cognitive maps—they become most active when a rat is introduced to a new environment. Once a mental map has been created, rats use them to recognize where they are. To find out if the place cells respond differently to virtual reality, the researchers created a virtual reality environment that was nearly identical to one that existed in the real world—including a treadmill type ball to allow for simulating movement. They then attached probes to the brains of several test rats and measured place cell activity as the rats were exposed to both the virtual reality environment and the real one.The researchers found that the level of place cell activity that occurred was dramatically different between the two environments. For the real world runs, approximately 45 percent of the rats’ place cells fired, compared to just 22 percent for the virtual reality runs.These results weren’t a surprise to the team as previous research has suggested that place cell activity is incited by at least three types of cues: visual, self-motion and proximal. Virtual reality in its current state isn’t capable of generating the sensation of a breeze kicking up, the smell of bacon frying or the way the ground responds beneath the feet—all of these are part of proximal awareness. In order for virtual reality to become truly immersive, the research suggests, proximal cues must be added to the virtual reality experience. A virtual reality scent system that fools human taste More information: Multisensory Control of Hippocampal Spatiotemporal Selectivity, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1232655ABSTRACTThe hippocampal cognitive map is thought to be driven by distal visual cues and self-motion cues. However, other sensory cues also influence place cells. Hence, we measured rat hippocampal activity in virtual reality (VR), where only distal visual and nonvestibular self-motion cues provided spatial information, and in the real world (RW). In VR, place cells showed robust spatial selectivity; however, only 20% were track active, compared with 45% in the RW. This indicates that distal visual and nonvestibular self-motion cues are sufficient to provide selectivity, but vestibular and other sensory cues present in RW are necessary to fully activate the place-cell population. In addition, bidirectional cells preferentially encoded distance along the track in VR, while encoding absolute position in RW. Taken together, these results suggest the differential contributions of these sensory cues in shaping the hippocampal population code. Theta frequency was reduced, and its speed dependence was abolished in VR, but phase precession was unaffected, constraining mechanisms governing both hippocampal theta oscillations and temporal coding. These results reveal cooperative and competitive interactions between sensory cues for control over hippocampal spatiotemporal selectivity and theta rhythm.See on MedicalXpress.com: Study shows that individual brain cells track where we are and how we movecenter_img Citation: Researchers find brain activity response different for virtual reality versus the real world (2013, May 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-brain-response-virtual-reality-real.html Journal information: Science (Phys.org) —A team of researchers from the University of California has found that one part of the brain in rats responds differently to virtual reality than to the real world. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the results of brain experiments they ran with rats. They found that “place” cells in the rats’ hippocampus didn’t light up as much when immersed in a virtual reality experiment as they did when the rats were engaging with the real world. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More

Best of Last Week – Halting photons a peer review problem and

first_img(Phys.org)—It was an interesting week even as we entered the holiday season, researchers at MIT found that halting photons could lead to miniature particle accelerators and perhaps improved data transmission. The light trapping process discovered last year involved twisting the polarization direction now appears to be related to a wide range of other seemingly unrelated phenomena. Also, physicist Robert Erlich claimed that neutrinos are likely tachyons, which would make them able to travel faster than light. He also believes the proof lies in finding the faster-than-light particles by weighing them. In space news, a team of Russian and American researchers found what they are calling the Milky Way’s new neighbor—an isolated dwarf galaxy that lies almost 7 million light years away from us; they have named it KKs3. Also a pair of researchers proposed using ballistic capture as a cheaper path to Mars—it involves putting a space craft into the orbital path of the Red planet and waiting for the planet to catch up, rather than shooting directly at it. Explore further Halting photons could lead to miniature particle accelerators, improved data transmission In biology news, a team of scientists created precursors to human egg and sperm in the lab—a sort of egg and sperm race. Meanwhile a locking mechanism was found for “scissors” that cut DNA by another team—an important part of the process of recombination that prevents enzymes from becoming overzealous. Also another team took what they are describing as “baby-steps” toward developing an anti-aging drug. The drug, originally meant to bolster the immune system in seniors, also appears to slow or halt the aging process.In other interesting news, a team of researchers unveiled a new programming language that automatically coordinates interactions between Web page components. It is called Ur/Web and it allows programmers to write Web applications as individual self-contained programs. Also another team of researchers has conducted a study that shows that peer review could reject breakthrough manuscripts.And finally, if you have been considering getting a Nook or other similar device to use at night to help with sleeping, you might want to know that a team of researchers has found that light-emitting e-readers detrimentally shift the circadian clock, which could mean using them might actually make sleeping regularly more difficult. © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img Citation: Best of Last Week – Halting photons, a peer review problem and circadian clock shifting from e-readers (2014, December 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-week-halting-photons-peer-problem.html Vortices of bound states in the continuum. The left panel shows five bound states in the continuum in a photonic crystal slab as bright spots. The right panel shows the polarization vector field in the same region as the left panel, revealing five vortices at the locations of the bound states in the continuum. These vortices are characterized with topological charges +1 or -1. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More

An economic model to help policymakers understand willingness to deal with climate

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Evaluating the contribution of black carbon to climate change Citation: An economic model to help policymakers understand willingness to deal with climate change efforts (2018, September 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-economic-policymakers-willingness-climate-efforts.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain © 2018 Phys.org Climate change is happening because we have pumped so much carbon dioxide and other gases into the atmosphere that it is causing the planet to heat up. And most scientists agree that as the planet heats up, there his a high likelihood of things like more damaging storms or longer droughts—some events might even be categorized as catastrophic. Yet, amazingly, we are still doing little to stop it. We are still driving gas-powered cars and creating electricity by burning coal. We are still having meetings and making pledges to lower emissions, even as the planet continues to warm.Besley and Dixit suggest the reason the world has not responded in a serious way to the threat of climate change is because there is no way those in charge can properly assess when and where catastrophic events due to climate change will occur. They believe that policymakers require a means for assessing the willingness to pay for carbon emission reductions based on the odds of catastrophic events occurring in a given time frame. To address this problem, they have created a model (an Excel spreadsheet) that accounts for various factors and returns answers that represent the willingness of an entity to take on such an effort under a given set of circumstances. The underlying measurement is money. What are the costs if a major city is hit by a catastrophic storm, for example? Or if a drought wipes out a country’s ability to grow food? To make their model, the researchers used real-world statistics such as the costs involved in the cleanup after Hurricane Katrina laid waste to much of New Orleans.The researchers note that using the model suggests some common assumptions are correct: For instance, the willingness of one country to enact mitigation efforts is strongly impacted by efforts carried out by others. Their model also suggests that the mitigation effort that appears most feasible at this time is implementation of a carbon tax.center_img Two economists, one with the London School of Economics and Political Science, the other with Princeton University, have created a model to assist policymakers in better understanding willingness issues related to climate change mitigation efforts. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Timothy Besley and Avinash Dixit describe how their model works and the ways it could be used. More information: Timothy Besley et al. Environmental catastrophes and mitigation policies in a multiregion world, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1802864115 Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More

A petal of peac

first_imgVisual Art Gallery presents Prashanti- solo art exhibition by Pushpa Bagrodia and  curated by Uma Nair. Six or so paintings of a large format will be displayed in the show that will be inaugurated by and member of Parliament Jaya Bachchan. The exhibition will be held at the Visual Art Gallery, at the Capital’s India Habitat Center from December 11 to 18. These works have their origin in a series of perspective studies of flowers and plants, in which the position of the horizon line has been shifted within an  intuition of a nature lover. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The resulting “structures” of flowers serve as the framework for the development of the works in which flowers gradually take form and spiritual substance. Scraps of narrative become discernible and relate to one another, suggestive of the aesthetic typical of a meditative mood. Also in the show are a series of seascapes and plant studies allied with the beauty springing from the artist’s brush. Art critic Uma Nair who has penned an essay for a book states that “Pushpa Bagrodia is India’s Georgia OKeefe-her works emanate a poetics of banality, an aesthetic of the outskirts shot through with echoes of nature rhythms.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixElsewhere, the silhouette of palms and bamboo stalks and leaves fill the spaces of the work that seem to stem from organic laws of painting more than from a requirement for narrative. Rather than the staging of a guiding narration, Pushpa Bagrodia’s viewpoint is articulated in a manner of painting the world that surrounds her in her lush landscaped home at Vasant Kunj Farms.She envisages her subjects as a concentrated construction in process, interrupted in each painting and continued in the next, reaching towards an end that is more utopian and eternal in tonality. She thus presents us with the “experience of a painting” rather than the “painting of an experience”, entifying in the pictorial field the subtle blend of the Impressionist and the Realist schools of the past. A book on her works will also be released by Jaya Bachchan. The quiet thinker who plumbs the depths of nature to create realist studies that capture the limpid tones of the lotus pond, Pushpa Bagrodia is one of those silent workers who embraces nature’s bounties with a serenity you can’t imagine. “Even when I traveled in later and early years, my unconscious search would be to find  trees and plants,” says she. “It excites me, anytime any place.” She takes photographs of plants and trees and landscapes wherever she goes and comes back and puts it to paper with her watercolour pencils. In her early years she learned from the wash artist Indra Dugar. Over the past 15 years she has been mentored by the brilliant water colourist Sudip Roy. She held many exhibitions in Calcutta, Mumbai, Delhi, Jaipur and Chandigarh.Where: Visual Art Gallery, India Habitat Center, New DelhiWhen: December 11- 18last_img read more

Read More

Mamata congratulates Stalin

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee today congratulated M K Stalin for being elected as the president of DMK. Stalin had earlier expressed support to Banerjee’s efforts to bring together various political parties to oppose the BJP. “Congratulations and best wishes to @mkstalin for being elected president of the DMK @arivalayam”, she said in a tweet. Stalin was today elevated as the DMK president. At the party’s General Council meeting held in Chennai, DMK general secretary K Anbazhagan said Stalin was elected unopposed, as he was the sole candidate who had filed nomination for the party chief’s post on August 26.last_img

Read More

Vitamin C rich diet may slow down cataracts

first_imgEating a diet rich in vitamin C may slow the progression of cataract — a condition that may lead to blindness, reveals a study, adding that environmental factors and diet also influence cataract more than genetic factors.The findings showed that those participants who had a higher intake of vitamin C were associated with a 33 percent risk reduction of cataract progression and had “clearer” lenses 10 years after the study than those who had consumed less vitamin C as part of their diet. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“The findings of this study could have significant impact, particularly for the ageing population globally, by suggesting that simple dietary changes such as increased intake of fruit and vegetables as part of a healthier diet could help protect them from cataracts,” said lead study author Chris Hammond from the Kings College London.“While we cannot avoid getting older, diabetes and smoking are also risk factors for this type of cataract, and so a healthy balanced diet and lifestyle generally should reduce the risk of needing a cataract operation,” Hammond added. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixCataract is a common condition in which the lens of the eye becomes cloudy as a result of oxidation over time. The study, published in the journal Ophthalmology, looked at the progression of cataracts in the eyes of 324 pairs of female twins over 10 years by examining photographs of the participant’s lenses that allowed them to analyse the level of opacity of the lens in detail. Participant intake of vitamin C was also measured using a food questionnaire. The study found that environmental factors — including diet — influenced cataract more than genetic factors, which only explained a third of the change in lens opacity.It is thought that increased intake of vitamin C has a protective effect on cataract progression by increasing the vitamin C available in the eye fluid.“The human body cannot manufacture vitamin C, so we depend on vitamins in the food we eat. “We did not find a significantly reduced risk in people who took vitamin tablets, so it seems that a healthy diet is better than supplements,” added study’s first author Kate Yonova-Doing.last_img read more

Read More