World records: DJ Gilles Peterson on why Ibiza is dead

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity Weekzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldLivestlyThe Best Redhead Actresses, RankedLivestlyNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableySenior Living | Search AdsSenior Apartments Coming to Scottsdale (Take A Look At The Prices)Senior Living | Search AdsMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan TimesBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Explains: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin” (No Creams Needed)Beverly Hills MD whatsapp Express KCS Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Get him talking about “world music” – a somewhat outdated term in a digital age – and tangent leads to tangent leads to tangent until you’re not sure where either of you started off. So what does the man who listens to everything reckon will be the next big sound?“There’s a lot of killer stuff coming out of places like Algeria, Morocco and Syria, artists like Omar Souleyman, who are incredible” he says. “There’s a group of DJs in Paris called Acid Arab and they’re smashing it – what they’re producing sounds so fresh.“There’s great music in every part of the world just waiting to be found – Panama, Chile, Peru, Haiti, Japan. There’s a record label called Innovative Leisure who just made a crazy psychedelic record in Thailand with a local group and it’s perfect for the Pitchfork generation. I want to make a record in Indonesia, a kind of Balinese gamelan jazz. I just love the essence of that music. When I first heard it I thought: ‘This is so beautiful and so me’. I’m into repetitive trance, and a lot of jazz is like is like that. It’s kind of the source of that music.“Then there’s LA, which used to be a bit of a damp squib, living in the shadow of a certain Hollywood lifestyle, but in the last 10 years a subculture has developed and music has really opened up – now you have loads of great beatmakers and artists coming out of there.” Peterson has produced a radio station for Air New Zealand’s business class service to Auckland via Los Angeles as part of its Long LAX project. For more information go to airnewzealand.co.uk. Gilles Peterson gets around a bit. He’s like a globe-trotting John Peel, one of the few mainstream DJs who can get away with playing everything from Sierra Leonean psychedelic afro to Japanese punk-jazz.On top of his BBC 6 Music show he runs the Worldwide Festival in Sète and spins records at some of the world’s coolest clubs. Last summer he produced a samba album in Brazil to add to the four he’s recorded in Cuba. He’s even curated a radio station for Grand Theft Auto, and another for Air New Zealand.center_img He’s been at the sharp end of the industry for almost three decades now – how does today’s scene compare to the glory days of acid house when he was starting out? “The 25 year-olds who come to my gigs are totally on it. They’re so culturally tuned in – far more than I was at that age. I think they’re sick of the lowest common denominator stuff, and they’re hungry for anything new. It’s like Ibiza – the kids aren’t into it anymore, they realise it’s this tried and tested formula. Last year I decided I’m never going back. The whole thing about Ibiza being the home of dance music is rubbish – even in the glory days it was very conservative. None of the cutting edge DJs had that much to do with it.”Aside from music, Peterson is fanatical about running (he’s finished two marathons despite being a smoker). But he turned 50 last year – surely playing in clubs until the wee small hours week-in, week-out takes its toll? “I don’t do 5am gigs anymore, I’d rather do all day Sunday and then get to bed. I play a couple of club-nights a week and I play what I want, where I want, how I want. I don’t have to turn up and play techno or drum ‘n’ bass. If I want to play a weird, freaky record, people will accept that. Still, about twice a year I say I’m giving up. I don’t know if I want to be zipping around clubs when I’m 65. I might open a restaurant. DJing is a bit like being a chef; you get your ingredients, get seasonal stuff, make something with it.”The difference is, most chefs don’t have 50,000 ingredients in their kitchen, which is how many records Peterson says he owns. He must have a pretty stringent system for keeping that in check – Dewey Decimal, maybe… “It’s organised chaos, split over three properties. Before a show I’ll just pull something out at random – every track brings back a memory and it spirals from there. I have a pretty amazing knack for remembering music – ask me about a Japanese record that came out five years ago and I’ll tell you the tracks on it, the label it came out on. It only works with music, though – my wife is Japanese and I must have been to Japan 50 or 100 times; I still can’t speak a word.”Given his global taste in music, was he ever tempted to move abroad?“I love London too much. London is like New York in the 90s. It’s constantly reinventing itself in music, art, fashion. It’s got the creativity of Berlin but it’s not just a bunch of white people. It’s the most international city in the world and it has an appetite for chaos.” That chaos needs a soundtrack and Peterson is just about the best person I can think of to provide it. World records: DJ Gilles Peterson on why Ibiza is dead Share Tags: Bespoke Thursday 5 February 2015 8:06 pm Phew, that’s a lot to take in. How does he keep up with such a vast, constantly shifting scene? “A lot of the work is done for me – I pick up a lot of stuff from people I know in France. Other records are sent to me – guys like Flying Lotus and James Blake, who I supported early and know my taste, will think ‘Gilles will love this’ – it helps me to stay right where it’s all happening.”last_img read more

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SEC awards whistleblower more than US$700,000

first_img Keywords WhistleblowersCompanies Securities and Exchange Commission Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Prospect of whistleblower riches causes friction “The voluntary submission of high-quality analysis by industry experts can be every bit as valuable as first-hand knowledge of wrongdoing by company insiders,” says Andrew Ceresney, director of the SEC’s enforcement division, in a statement. Sean McKessy, chief of the SEC’s Office of the Whistleblower, adds, “This award demonstrates the commission’s commitment to awarding those who voluntarily provide independent analysis as well as independent knowledge of securities law violations to the agency. We welcome analytical information from those with in-depth market knowledge and experience that may provide the springboard for an investigation.” The SEC’s whistleblower program has now paid more than US$55 million to 23 individuals since its launch in 2011, the U.S. regulator notes. The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) is proposing to launch a similar program, which would pay tipsters for information that leads to successful enforcement action by the commission. The comment period on the OSC’s proposals closed earlier this week. See: Regulation: Nabbing crooks Related news Zoom seminar debacle attracts OSC warning Share this article and your comments with peers on social media James Langton The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Friday announced that a researcher who conducted a detailed analysis that led to a successful SEC enforcement action will receive a payment of more than US$700,000. To protect the identity of whistleblowers, the SEC does not publish the details of these cases, although it does note that it was an independent analysis that helped spark enforcement action, leading to this latest payout. SEC’s whistleblower payouts top US$900 millionlast_img read more

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Focus on Academics: Office hours

first_imgCategories:AcademicsCampus Community Office hours are your opportunity for one-on-one attention from your professor. Be sure to check your professors’ office hours schedules and sign up to get the most out of your classes.Faculty office hours tips:Going to office hours is your chance to meet face to face with your professors and advisor. Take advantage of the opportunity and get to know them.If you have questions or concerns about a class, or even an assignment or project, office hours are a great time to address them with your professor.Regularly attending office hours may open the door to opportunities you didn’t know about, such as research projects.Drop-in hours are your opportunity to ask advisors quick questions and take place every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m.Advisor drop-in hours tips:These are a great opportunity to speak to advisors all over campus and explore academic opportunities.If you have questions or concerns about certificates, classes, majors, minors, research, tutoring . . . an advisor can connect you to the appropriate office or resources.Have a quick question? Stop in. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img Published: Sept. 6, 2016 last_img read more

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“Cruise with Cause” Heralds Faith Based Tourism

first_img“Cruise with Cause” Heralds Faith Based Tourism TourismJune 2, 2011 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail MONTEGO BAY — After two years of intense planning and praying, “Cruise with a Cause” became a reality yesterday, when the cruise ship, Carnival Destiny, docked at the Montego Bay Cruise Ship Pier, Freeport, St. James with some 5,000 Christian passengers on board. The passengers were immediately transported to some 230 educational institutions across western Jamaica, as well as prisons and children’s homes, to participate in a massive Christian outreach programme. They were scheduled to re-assemble at Dump Up Beach, Montego Bay, for Jamaica Praise Fest 2011, Wednesday afternoon. The arrival of the Carnival Destiny has heralded Jamaica’s entry into the lucrative faith based tourism arena, which is expected to earn the island millions of dollars in foreign exchange in the coming years. A joint effort between the internationally renowned Praise Fest and the Dove Ministries, the mission is aimed at reaching souls through a programme of activities conducted by well known Christian artistes, evangelists and performers, such as Donnie McClurkin, Hezekiah Walker, Tye Trippet and Byron Cage, who are expected to perform at the concert. Regional Director in the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) western office, Rose-Marie Johnson, told JIS News that she was overjoyed to witness the dream turn into reality, with the largest Christian mission to any country now on Jamaican soil. “It’s the largest mission ever to any country, with over 3,000 participants on the cruise ship Carnival Destiny,” she said. She noted that the buses would be going to some 230 schools, where the visitors would meet the students, give inspirational talks and hold devotions with them, as well as interactions and entertainment packages. “There will also be presentations from a number of dynamic speakers and some of our top tele-evangelists who are in Jamaica, as well as world renown artistes and gospel singers … who will be engaged in a ministry targeting the youths of our country,” Mrs. Johnson explained. She stated that the day’s activities would culminate at Dump Up Beach, with a concert featuring Jamaica’s Papa San and Carlene Davis among others, sharing stage with several top gospel singers from “Cruise with a Cause”. Director of Boss Jamaica Youth Development Foundation, Raina McClurkin, told JIS News that history recorded that while, years ago, ships came to Jamaica with slaves and pirates, today cruise ships are coming with transformed persons, worshipping Jesus Christ and sharing the message of salvation. “For me this is the most exciting time, because of where our young people are, even as we look at suicide and what’s taking place with our young people today, just to see that the hopelessness can be replaced with hopefulness,” Ms. McClurkin told JIS News. Related“Cruise with Cause” Heralds Faith Based Tourism Related“Cruise with Cause” Heralds Faith Based Tourism Related“Cruise with Cause” Heralds Faith Based Tourism By GLENIS ROSE, JIS Reporter Advertisementslast_img read more

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Dade County Bar names Berlin new executive director

first_imgDade County Bar names Berlin new executive director Bret Berlin has joined the Dade County Bar Association as its new executive director.Berlin will report to the board of directors and is responsible for the strategy and operations for DCBA’s staff, programs, expansion, and overall mission.“We are thrilled to have Bret on board,” said Jane Muir the DCBA’s president. “As a leader and executive, he brings a variety of experience from different fields to the position. From finance to administration and from fundraising to communications, he has the skills and the drive that we need at this time of growth and expansion at the DCBA.”“As one of the oldest and largest voluntary bar associations in Florida it is an exciting time to be a part of this great organization,” Berlin said. “We have an ambitious agenda including continuing to support law firms and attorneys as we all emerge from a year of uncertainty, serving the general public with the DCBA’s variety of programs that provide insight into the law and the court system, building our membership, and executing our long-range plan for renovating and fully activating the DCBA’s office building.”Berlin earned a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from the University of Florida, where he served as student body president, and an MBA in Finance and Entrepreneurship from Columbia Business School. Berlin brings business experience and political acumen to the position. He has served in executive leadership positions for companies in a range of industries, such as hospitality and internet marketing. He is the former chair of the Miami Dade Democratic Party and vice chair of the Florida Democratic Party. He is joining the DCBA from local real estate developer, Terra Group. Apr 30, 2021 Regular Newslast_img read more

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SoftBank, DT enter talks on Sprint/T-Mobile deal — report

first_img Tim Ferguson Tags Tim joined Mobile World Live in August 2011 and works across all channels, with a particular focus on apps. He came to the GSMA with five years of tech journalism experience, having started his career as a reporter… More Read more Deutsche TelekomFinancialSoftBankSprintT-Mobile USUS Related Home SoftBank, DT enter talks on Sprint/T-Mobile deal — report AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 20 JAN 2014 Deutsche Telekom eyes 5G, fibre lead T-Mobile US chief predicts market rebound Amazon reels in MGM SoftBank, the majority shareholder in Sprint, entered talks with Deutsche Telekom as it looks to combine its US operation with T-Mobile US, according to Bloomberg.Sources said SoftBank wants to discuss issues relating to a potential deal, including how much cash and stock it would need to pay for Deutsche Telekom’s 76 per cent stake in T-Mobile, as well as how Sprint and T-Mobile would be integrated.Another issue that needs to be addressed is a breakup fee in case such a deal fails. Sources said SoftBank and Sprint could not afford a financial penalty as high as the $7 billion in cash and assets that AT&T paid when its attempt to acquire T-Mobile failed in 2011.Deutsche Telekom is believed to want an all-cash offer, with SoftBank trying to finance a deal that includes as much cash as possible.Deutsche Telekom’s new CEO, Timotheus Hoettges, told Bloomberg in an interview that the company has recouped its investment in T-Mobile US with the value of its US operations back to the level it was when AT&T made its offer for the business.The increase in value has compensated for the EUR7.4 billion writedown Deutsche Telekom was forced to make on the asset in 2012.A potential deal that would combine Sprint and T-Mobile US is likely to face regulatory opposition, as the latter is deemed to play an important role in the US mobile market.T-Mobile’s ‘uncarrier’ strategy, in which customers can upgrade devices more freely, as well as the provision of lower prices than competitors and free international roaming, has seen it gain subscribers from other networks, providing the kind of competition that the US Justice Department has long sought.In a letter sent to the Justice Department and FCC on 7 January, the American Antitrust Institute said T-Mobile would be unlikely to continue its pricing approach if it was acquired by Sprint.As well as the pricing issue, the fact that a deal for Sprint to buy T-Mobile US would reduce the number of national US mobile operators from four to three is likely to be a cause for concern for regulators.Indeed, the Justice Department blocked AT&T’s effort to acquire T-Mobile in 2011, arguing that T-Mobile “places important competitive pressure on its three larger rivals”. It also voiced concern that the reduction to three nationwide operators would reduce competition, leading to higher prices for customers.However, a merged entity would position Sprint/T-Mobile US as a realistic match for AT&T and Verizon Wireless in the country’s mobile market.The new combination would have approximately 101 million connections against 110 million connections for AT&T and 118 million for Verizon Wireless (GSMA Intelligence, Q4 2013). Previous ArticleZTE set to announce return to profitabilityNext Article4G driving data usage but not all markets reaping the rewards Authorlast_img read more

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Verizon, AT&T tipped to gain most from tax reform

first_img Verizon shuffles executives Home Verizon, AT&T tipped to gain most from tax reform Tags Verizon sorts sensor supremo Previous ArticleNokia delivers LTE software to Project LoonNext ArticleBlackBerry details BB10, Priv support plans Amazon reels in MGM Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more Dominant carriers Verizon and AT&T stand to benefit most from tax reform plans under consideration by the US Congress, though the measure could spur increased investment across the industry, Wells Fargo Securities analysts predicted.Separate tax reform bills were recently passed by both houses of Congress. Negotiations are currently underway to find a middle ground both chambers can agree on, but reports suggest the final measure will lower the current 35 per cent corporate tax rate to around 21 per cent and include a provision allowing companies to deduct capital expenses for the next five years.In a research note, senior analyst Jennifer Fritzsche said the company believes Verizon and AT&T’s cash tax obligations (the sum companies must pay to meet their tax obligations to the government), capital intensity and moderate leverage will enable them to “fully deduct interest expense” under the reformed tax code. This will boost earnings per share and free cash flow, she explained.For example, by using the deduction provision on capex, AT&T and Verizon’s free cash flow could benefit to the tune of around $1.6 billion and $1.2 billion respectively, Fritzsche noted. Through 2018 and 2019, AT&T may see growth in earnings per share of 16 per cent and Verizon 20 per cent, she added.Broader benefitsWhile AT&T and Verizon were tipped to be in the best position to capitalise on the reform provisions, Fritzsche said capex deductions could spur increased investment across the industry. In addition to 5G rollouts, Fritzsche said Wells Fargo Securities believes “many investments could be accelerated to take advantage of capex deductibility,” including AT&T’s FirstNet build, T-Mobile’s 600MHz project and Sprint’s broad network enhancements.AT&T stated previously it will invest an additional $1 billion if reforms are passed: CFO John Stephens also hinted the tax overhaul could be a boon for the operator’s enterprise business by generating more demand for its services.But in a separate research note last week, MoffettNathanson analysts concluded Verizon and T-Mobile would be the top beneficiaries of tax reform. AT&T stands to gain less because “low taxes in the forecast period, lessen the impact of incremental tax cuts,” they noted.MoffetNathanson said tax reform is “irrelevant” for Sprint. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 15 DEC 2017 Related Author Diana Goovaerts AT&Ttax regulationsVerizonlast_img read more

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Mobile starting to dominate Wi-Fi but US still lags

first_img Smartphone users in 33 countries now experience faster speeds using a cellular network in comparison to Wi-Fi, but mobile technology in three developed markets including the US continue to underperform, a new OpenSignal report found.In a study looking into Wi-Fi and the mobile network experience, wireless mapping company OpenSignal said mobile download speeds proved superior to Wi-Fi in a range of countries, including richer nations like Australia and France, as well as less developed markets such as Qatar, Turkey, Mexico and South Africa.However, in three highly developed geographies – the US, Hong Kong and Singapore -“the mobile experience bucks the global trend” and “significantly underperforms” compared with smartphone users’ Wi-Fi download experience.On a mobile network, users in the three countries experience a slower download experience of -38.6Mb/s, 34Mb/s and 25Mb/s respectively, compared to Wi-Fi.Australia leadsOf all the countries analysed, smartphone users in Australia benefitted the most from using mobile over Wi-Fi, where average download speeds came in at 13Mb/s faster overall. Users in France had a 2.5Mb/s advantage, while Qatar and Turkey had an uplift of 11.8Mb/s and 7.3Mb/s respectively.OpenSignal said newer mobile technologies, such as 4G, increased mobile network superiority.“In 50 countries, 63 per cent of those studied, 4G networks offer a faster smartphone download experience than Wi-Fi, up from 41 per cent of countries when compared with overall mobile broadband experience instead of 4G,” said the company.On 3G, only seven countries experienced a faster experience, and even then, the experience was modest with an increase of 3Mb/s in Lebanon.OpenSignal added mobile technology is expected to dominate further through 5G, due to the pace of mobile innovation and the dependency of Wi-Fi experiences on fixed-network broadband deployments, “which are slow and expensive to upgrade with fibre to the premise (FTTP)”.The report added that operators and smartphone makers must “re-evaluate their Wi-Fi strategies”, in light of the results, especially around mobile offload, automatic network selection and indoor coverage to make sure they don’t push consumer smartphones onto “Wi-Fi that offers a worse experience than the mobile network”. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelona Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Home Mobile starting to dominate Wi-Fi but US still lags Author Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities Previous ArticleAltice Europe earnings slip despite SFR winsNext ArticleTikTok in-app purchases at record high Relatedcenter_img Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Asia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 22 NOV 2018 Kavit Majithia 4G5GOpenSignalWi-Fi Tags last_img read more

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Close to home, Woodland grabs PGA lead

first_imgST. LOUIS – Kansas-bred Gary Woodland felt right at home in enemy territory and delivered his best performance in a major on Thursday at the PGA Championship. Woodland used his power to birdie the two par 5s on the soft turf of Bellerive, and he relied on a new grip and new confidence in his putter for everything else on his way to a 6-under 64 for a one-shot lead over Rickie Fowler in the opening round of the year’s final major. Woodland recognized close to 100 friends and family among thousands in a gallery that withstood the sweltering weather, and his only fault was trying too hard. He made a careless bogey on the opening hole, had to make a 15-foot par putt at No. 5. And then he settled down and was on his way. ”This week is as close to home as I’ve been,” Woodland said. ”I snuck over here about a month ago and played the golf course. Really enjoyed the layout. The turf is very familiar to me. It’s so hot here during the summer, so the greens are soft and slow. You can be more aggressive, which suits my game.” Fowler played in the morning, when the greens were slightly smoother, and made five birdies over his last 11 holes for a 65. It was an important start for Fowler, who turns 30 this year and already is regarded as among the best without a major. The closest he has come to such a trophy is celebrating those won by his friends. ”It’s not something I necessarily worry about,” Fowler said. ”Keep putting ourselves in position, get in contention … we have had plenty of runner-ups. Jack (Nicklaus) had a lot of runner-ups. We’ll just keep beating down that door.” PGA Championship: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage Bellerive allowed for low scoring, provided the ball stayed in the short grass. Woodland had an 18-foot birdie attempt on the 18th hole that would have tied the PGA Championship record, and it stopped just short. It was one of the few he missed. Two-time major champion Zach Johnson and Brandon Stone of South Africa were at 66. Dustin Johnson reached 5 under until a few wild drives on the back nine cost him. The world’s No. 1 player had to settle for a 67, along with Jason Day, Justin Rose and eight other players. It was more of a struggle for Tiger Woods, drenched in so much sweat that he changed shirts after 12 shots – that was only two holes and a tee shot. He had to make an 8-foot putt to escape with bogey on No. 10, and then dumped a wedge into the water for double bogey on No. 11. Woods was 3 over through seven holes, and then clawed his way back to even par for a 70. ”A lot of things could happen. Not a lot them were positive,” Woods said. ”But I hung in there and turned it around.” Defending champion Justin Thomas let a good start slip away. He didn’t make a putt outside a few feet over the last 12 holes and shot 69. Jordan Spieth, in his second crack at the career Grand Slam, opened with a double bogey and finished with two bad swings off the tee that sent him to a 71. The secret was simple: Avoid the rough. Woodland, who played college basketball for one year at Washburn as a freshman before switching to golf at Kansas, is among the most powerful, athletic figures in golf. He had 145 yards to the front on No. 5 and couldn’t get it to the green.last_img read more

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Wise Oysters, Galloping Sea Stars, and More: Biological Marvels Keep Coming

first_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share TagsArizona State UniversitybarbulesbirdsbouncingCalifornia condorCassin’s hummingbirdcowsDarwinian evolutiondistributed nervous systemdoveechinodermsEva KansoEvolutionary ApplicationsfeathersFlightFox Newsgeesegrasshoppersgravitymaterials sciencemicrostructuresmother-of-pearlnacreNew York PostOkinawa Institute of Science and Technologypearl oysterpigeonPinctada fucataroboticsScience (journal)sea starsskeletonUniversity of Southern CaliforniaVelcroViterbi School of Engineering,Trending “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Scientists at the University of Southern California wondered how the echinoderms do it without a brain or centralized nervous system. The undersides of sea stars are composed of hundreds of “tube feet” which can move autonomously. How do they engage in coordinated motion? The answer, from researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, was recently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface: sea star[s] couple a global directionality command from a “dominant arm” with individual, localized responses to stimuli to achieve coordinated locomotion. In other words, once the sea star provides an instruction on which way to move, the individual feet figure out how to achieve this on their own, without further communication.That would be a cool strategy for robots, the engineers figure. In fact, they built a model based on sea star motion, and show both the animal and robot movement side by side in the video above. No other animal movement seems to use this strategy. “In the case of the sea star, the nervous system seems to rely on the physics of the interaction between the body and the environment to control locomotion. All of the tube feet are attached structurally to the sea star and thus, to each other.”In this way, there is a mechanism for “information” to be communicated mechanically between tube feet. Even though one of the team members was a “professor of ecology and evolutionary biology,” he seemed to rely more on the engineers than on Darwin. Understanding how a distributed nervous system, like that of a sea star, achieves complex, coordinated motions could lead to advancements in areas such as robotics. In robotics systems, it is relatively straightforward to program a robot to perform repetitive tasks. However, in more complex situations where customization is required, robots face difficulties. How can robots be engineered to apply the same benefits to a more complex problem or environment?The answer might lie in the sea star model, [Eva] Kanso said. “Using the example of a sea star, we can design controllers so that learning can happen hierarchically. There is a decentralized component for both decision-making and for communicating to a global authority. This could be useful for designing control algorithms for systems with multiple actuators, where we are delegating a lot of the control to the physics of the system — mechanical coupling — versus the input or intervention of a central controller.”Once again, the search to understand a design in nature propels further research that can aid in the design of products for human flourishing.Quickies:Grasshoppers don’t faint when they leap. Why? Arizona State wants to know how the insects keep their heads while taking off and landing in all kinds of different orientations. Gravity should be making the blood slosh around, causing dizziness and disorientation, but it doesn’t. Apparently it has something to do with the distribution of air sacs that automatically adjust to gravity, keeping the hemolymph (insect blood) from rapidly moving about in the head and body. “Thus, similar to vertebrates, grasshoppers have mechanisms to adjust to gravitational effects on their blood,” they say.Cows know more than their blank stares indicate. Articles from Fox News and the New York Post had fun with a “shocking study” about “cowmoooonication” published in Nature’s open-access journal Scientific Reports. Experiments with 13 Holstein heifers seem to indicate that they all know each other’s names, and can learn where food is located, and more, from each other’s “individual moos.” They regularly share “cues in certain situations and express different emotions, including excitement, arousal, engagement and distress.” Other scientists are praising young researcher Ali Green, whose 333 recordings and voice analysis studies of moooosic is like “building a Google translate for cows.”Design appears everywhere scientists look when they take their Darwin glasses off. For quality research that actually does some good for people, join the Uprising.Photo credit: Japanese pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata, via Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (press release). Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Recommended Intelligent Design Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Life Sciences Wise Oysters, Galloping Sea Stars, and More: Biological Marvels Keep ComingEvolution News @DiscoveryCSCJanuary 28, 2020, 12:34 PM Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Strong theories in science require fewer auxiliary hypotheses when new discoveries come to light. Design advocates can gain confidence when discoveries continue to illustrate the core principles of intelligent design, like irreducible complexity, meaningful information, and hierarchical design, while undermining the blind, gradualistic principles of Darwinian evolution. Here are some recent illustrations.“Pearls of Wisdom”That’s the headline on news from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, where the only thing said about evolution is that “From a genetic and evolutionary perspective, scientists have known little about the source of these pearls” in the Japanese pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. By implication, don’t look for pearls of wisdom from evolutionary theory. The research published in Evolutionary Applications only concerns genetic variations within the species and the geographic distributions of isolated populations. If it helps conserve these oysters with their magnificent mother-of-pearl nacre — the envy of materials scientists — well, it’s wise to keep jewelry makers in business. Design scores as evolution fumbles.Flight FeathersAnother level of design has been uncovered in bird feathers. In Science Magazine, Matloff et al. discuss “How flight feathers stick together to form a continuous morphing wing.” Pigeon and dove wing feathers spread out from their folded position into beautiful fans, as most people know. But how do birds prevent gaps from opening up between individual wing feathers? The team found a combination of factors at work. Birds can dynamically alter the shape of their wings during flight, although how this is accomplished is poorly understood. Matloff et al. found that two mechanisms control the movement of the individual feathers. Whenever the skeleton moves, the feathers are redistributed passively through compliance of the elastic connective tissue at the feather base. To prevent the feathers from spreading too far apart, hook-shaped microstructures on adjacent feathers form a directional fastener that locks adjacent feathers.Notice that the muscles, bones, and connective tissue inside the skin work in synergy with the exterior hooks on the wings. Using a robot mimic, the team found that (1) the muscles for each feather keep the angle just right to spread them into a fan arrangement, and (2) the barbules snap together quickly to create a lightweight, flexible surface without breaks. The barbules can quickly detach like the hook-and-loop materials we are all familiar with.This clarifies the function of the thousands of fastening barbules on the underlapping flight feathers; they lock probabilistically with the tens to hundreds of hooked rami of the overlapping flight feather and form a feather-separation end stop. The emergent properties of the interfeather fastener are not only probabilistic like bur fruit hooks, which inspired Velcro, but also highly directional like gecko feet setae — a combination that has not been observed before.Rapid opening and closing of wings makes a little bit of noise a bit like Velcro does, explaining the din when a flock of geese takes off. Interestingly, the researchers found that night flyers like owls, which need silent wings as they hunt, “lack the lobate cilia and hooked rami in regions of feather overlap and instead have modified barbules with elongated, thin, velvety pennualue” that produce relatively little noise. Otherwise, this amazing complex mechanism works at scales all the way from a tiny 40-gram Cassin’s hummingbird to the 9000-gram California condor. What’s an evolutionist going to say about this ingenious mechanism? Once upon a time, a dinosaur leaped out of a tree and… died.Distributed RunningSea stars, seen in time-lapse videos, appear to “run” across the sea floor, bouncing as they go: Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Evolution NewsEvolution News & Science Today (EN) provides original reporting and analysis about evolution, neuroscience, bioethics, intelligent design and other science-related issues, including breaking news about scientific research. It also covers the impact of science on culture and conflicts over free speech and academic freedom in science. Finally, it fact-checks and critiques media coverage of scientific issues. Share A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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